“I’m not a Businessman, I’m a Business, Man”

YOU'RE HIRED!

The New York Times recently featured an article that suggested that instead of looking for experience when hiring for new positions, companies should consider hiring individuals with one or two years of work experience, or better yet, those fresh out of college (*cough or graduate school*). Most of us either have personally been victims of exclusion based on “inexperience” or have witnessed our elders’ strong resistance to new innovations based on their often blatantly expired mentality (social media, anyone?). It is rare that an experienced professional is an early adopter. Why do you think this is?

“More often than not, I find that those who come with experience and credentials have set ways; they don’t bring as much energy or out-of-the-box thinking as the untrained junior staff.” Can I get a hallelujah? But wait, I hesitate to be too overoptimistic. Undoubtedly there are specialized jobs in which experience is vital. In areas such as science and law, experience is invaluable. However, in jobs were creativity takes precedent, we find our place. Although, if we follow this logic, we will inevitably come to a screeching halt…what happens when the kids we once babysat come knocking on our office doors with an eviction notice and a smile? How can we keep up with not the Jones’, but the Sallys’ and Bobbys’ of the next generation?

Perhaps we can think of ourselves as a business within a business. In the words of Kanye, “I’m not a business man, I am a business, man.”  That is, we have to keep taking on the new and latest ideas in order to reinvent ourselves. Otherwise, we will be replaced. “In building a global team, I’ve found that people who have fire in their belly, who come to learn, and who are open to adaptation are the ones who flourish.” It is our job within a job to continuously add fuel to the fire, to strive for our personal best, and to become irreplaceable within our organizations. In psychological terms, we must be careful to not self-stereotype, the process that individuals define themselves in terms of their group membership. Instead, we have to understand ourselves as evolving in nature and capable of innovation and creativity at all times. We have learned over and again in Organizational Psychology the importance of the hiring process and the thought that must be evaluated in both finding the right fit and assessment of the psychological contract between employee and employer. There is a shared sense of responsibility, but on our end, this begs the question, how can we position ourselves in a way in which to ensure our own personal innovation?

“I am not young enough to know everything” -Oscar Wilde

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